Posts filed under ‘The T in F.I.T.’

Self-Efficacy – 4th Component of the Transtheoretical Model of Change

Self-Efficacy

Transtheoretical Model of Change, Component #4

Self-Efficacy is defined as the belief in one’s ability to complete a task. As one progresses through the Stages of Change, we begin to see one’s belief in himself grow and grow. It is similar to self-confidence in that an individual begins to believe in himself.

However, self-efficacy is task-specific. It is influenced by past performance and experiences, support from others that build trust, physiological responses (heart rate, increased lung capacity, perceived exertion, etc.) as well as any emotional responses associated with the accomplished task.

People with a strong sense of self-efficacy:

  • View challenging problems as tasks to be mastered.
  • Will CHOOSE challenging acts to complete and pour more effort into achievement of that task.
  • Develop deeper interest in the activities in which they participate.
  • Persistent in their efforts to complete the task.
  • Form a stronger sense of commitment to their interests and activities.
  • Recover quickly from setbacks and disappointments.

Additionally, those individuals with a strong sense of themselves will further increase their self-efficacy by accomplishing the tasks they set out to achieve.

Working to improve your self-efficacy level will improve your probability of achieving a desired behavior. To learn a little more about Self-Efficacy, lows and highs, please visit our blog on Self-Efficacy.

And as always, health is in you, let’s find it together.

To your health,

DietTrifecta Logo only.jpg

Patti Zikmund
CPBA, CPVA, Spinning®, WKC® Fitness Trainer

Web: www.diettrifecta.com

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April 8, 2012 at 07:00 Leave a comment

Decisional Balance (3rd Component of the Transtheoretical Model)

Decisional Balance

Transtheoretical Model of Change, Component #3

This is the 3rd component of the Transtheoretical Model of Change (TMoC) about which we highlighted a few weeks ago.

Decisional Balance assumes that making changes about a healthier lifestyle involves a weighing of good vs. bad OR benefits vs. losses. As one progresses through the Stages of Change, a shift from risk to benefits occurs.

In the early stages of change (precontemplation and contemplation), individuals typically see more risk than benefit to changes in healthy lifestyle. Why? Because they have little understanding of how to go about making this change in behavior. Additionally, they are sometimes even unaware of the problem or believe that it cannot be solved. In the mid stages (preparation), the risks and benefits appear equal, which may sometimes leave individuals stuck in this stage. In the late stages of change (maintenance ad action), the benefits outweigh the risks, which pushes the individual towards desired results.

So – you see, as an individual progresses through the Stages of Change, he begins to weigh the risks against the benefits. Our goal is to shift our behaviors and insight to “see” the power of the benefits and turn risk into gain.  Your goal – eliminate anxieties and any irrational beliefs.  This will lead you on a path to continued success. 🙂

-Patti Zikmund

April 1, 2012 at 07:00 Leave a comment

Transtheoretical Model of Change

Transtheoretical Model of Change

Stages of Behavioral Change

The Transtheoretical Model of Change is a framework developed to describe the varying stages of acquiring and maintaining a healthy behavior. It is based on the assumption and evident fact that people progress through stages at different rates.

Perhaps you were just curious when you took the assessment and weren’t sure you were quite ready to begin. That’s okay. We are all different and are sometimes at potentially different stages of acquiring and maintaining a healthy behavior. As you embark on your journey, ask yourself these important questions:

  • Are you making the decision to change a behavior for yourself?
  • Will your friends, family or loved ones support you on this journey?
  • Are you willing to make a commitment to this change, even though it may be tough and challenging at times?

If you can answer “yes” to these questions, the more ready you are to commit to change. Design a strategy based on what stage you fall – not the stage where someone else WANTS you to fall. Be appropriate to your goals.

The Transtheoretical Model of Change has 4 components which are hypothesized to influence behavior:

  1. Stages of Change – where exactly do YOU fall in changing your lifestyle?
  2. Process of Change – what strategy do YOU use to move through the Stages of Change?
  3. Decisional Balance – weighing the benefits
  4. Self-Efficacy – belief in yourself to complete the task

We will highlight each of these components separately in the upcoming weeks. Make sure to check back here as we post new information!

And as always, health is in you, let’s find it together.

To your health,

DietTrifecta Logo only.jpg

Patti Zikmund
CPBA, CPVA, Spinning®, WKC® Fitness Trainer

Web: www.diettrifecta.com
Blog:  https://diettrifecta.wordpress.com/

March 19, 2012 at 07:00 Leave a comment

Stages of Behavioral Change

Stages of Change

 Transtheoretical Model of Change
By Patti Zikmund
This is the 1st component of the Transtheoretical Model of Change about which we highlighted a week ago in an email to you. There are 5 stages of change presented in the Transtheoretical Model which we will describe briefly below:
Precontemplation:
  • A person in this stage of change has no plans or ideas to change his/her behavior within the next 6 months.
  • He is neither engaged nor contemplating change.

Contemplation:

  • An individual in this stage is contemplating change within the next 6 months.
  • He/she will weigh the costs and benefits necessary for this change.

Preparation:

  • A person in this stage is preparing to commit to change within 30 days and has made some steps toward a healthier behavior.
  • He/She is mentally and physically preparing for change.

Action:

  • A person in this stage has been active for less than 6 months and has shown improved behavior.
  • He/She has a high desire to change his/her beliefs or attitudes about a healthier lifestyle.

Maintenance:

  • A person in this stage has been active for more than 6 months and shows a high level of self-efficacy.
  • He/She has developed a strategy to cope with any possible lapses in activity.

Every individual progresses through these stages at different rates. They may lapse into an earlier state or even stay stagnant in one phase for an extended periods of time.

And as always, health is in you, let’s find it together.

To your health,

DietTrifecta Logo only.jpg

Patti Zikmund
CPBA, CPVA, Spinning®, WKC® Fitness Trainer

Web: www.diettrifecta.com

March 17, 2012 at 07:00 Leave a comment

Healthy Weights for Men and Women

Your Healthy Weight

It’s so easy to just get caught up in numbers when it involves weight. We have a tendency to think that less is best, which, of course, is not true.  What’s best for you, may not be best for someone else.  And weighing 110 pounds at 5’10” is nowhere near healthy. But you will have people fighting to weigh as less as possible.  However, I think you’ll be surprised to find the healthy weight range listed for your height is more expansive than you think. 🙂

We’ve compiled some tables for you, so that you may see where a healthy weight falls for YOU.

Then, set your goals accordingly and commence. Make sure to set realistic and obtainable goals. Keep it simple and smart.

Healthy Weight Ranges for Men and Women.pdf
As always, to your health,

 

March 13, 2012 at 18:59 Leave a comment

I am now a triathlete…..

The "T" in F.I.T.

Well, I got out of my long distance running comfort and did what I never thought I’d do.  I swam, I biked and then…and only then… I ran.   In that exact order.

Now – for a gal who’s used to running straight for a little over 3 hours covering 26.2 miles, this was quite a change of pace for me. I mean – gosh – I got to actually STOP and change my sport just when I was about to get tired and maybe even bored .  Super cool.

Especially considering I trained for this event for a whopping 2 ½ weeks, swam only 4 times in the last 3+years, practiced that transition thingie from and to each new discipline only 2 times…….wow (and please don’t ever train like that….). I finished and thought, well gosh, Patti, look what you just accomplished?  You totally rock.  No training.  And then, of course, the insane thought occurred – Yes, I think….I need to do a longer one indeed.  If I train for double that time, I should win!!

Being the athlete that I am…..I know darn well that’s not happening anytime soon. But hey…a girl can dream, can’t she?

And now…I call myself a triathlete.

~ patti

June 11, 2011 at 00:36 Leave a comment


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